Staring @ The Sun is opening tonight, from 7-9 featuring the work of Melissa Murray. 

Staring @ The Sun is opening tonight, from 7-9 featuring the work of Melissa Murray. 

We look forward to seeing you all tonight! Here is a map of our new place!

We look forward to seeing you all tonight! Here is a map of our new place!

Come join us August 31st, 7-9, to mourn and celebrate all things summer with the first show in our new space, “Endless Bummer”, featuring prints from artist Brooke Bamford.
Refreshments will be available.
See ya’ll there!
August 31 - September 19 open by appointmentFind FORUS on FaceBook

Come join us August 31st, 7-9, to mourn and celebrate all things summer with the first show in our new space, “Endless Bummer”, featuring prints from artist Brooke Bamford.

Refreshments will be available.

See ya’ll there!

August 31 - September 19 open by appointment

Find FORUS on FaceBook

April 5th, 2012
Boundaries are invisible until they are broken. In the series Territory, Sarah Milbrath examines domestic animals’ ownership of spaces and the limits of their boundaries while juxtaposing this tension with the personal boundaries humans establish. Although animals are not always attributed consciousness of the “self”, they are, however, capable of expression. In many ways, animals embody a more true form of human emotion. Their attenuated sense of shame or embarrassment makes their reactions seem more genuine than ours. 
In making this series Sarah took photographs leading up to and past the limits of an animal’s territory. These photographs capture the moment of realization, just before a reaction is provoked. When the boundary is crossed, the animal’s tension reaches its peak. The response to each intrusion is unique, with varying reactions. Some seek affection or comfort, while others respond with a reproachful gaze or gesture that seems threatening. The variety of expressions, poses, and distances highlights how personal these spaces become.As humans we have taught ourselves to disregard moments in which our personal space is entered, to tolerate it and not directly react. The limbic and possessive reaction of animals has drawn Sarah to this idea of breaking boundaries, of forcing oneself on to the Other. These animals’ reactions may suggest what we want but cannot do.

April 5th, 2012

Boundaries are invisible until they are broken. In the series Territory, Sarah Milbrath examines domestic animals’ ownership of spaces and the limits of their boundaries while juxtaposing this tension with the personal boundaries humans establish. Although animals are not always attributed consciousness of the “self”, they are, however, capable of expression. In many ways, animals embody a more true form of human emotion. Their attenuated sense of shame or embarrassment makes their reactions seem more genuine than ours. 


In making this series Sarah took photographs leading up to and past the limits of an animal’s territory. These photographs capture the moment of realization, just before a reaction is provoked. When the boundary is crossed, the animal’s tension reaches its peak. The response to each intrusion is unique, with varying reactions. Some seek affection or comfort, while others respond with a reproachful gaze or gesture that seems threatening. The variety of expressions, poses, and distances highlights how personal these spaces become.

As humans we have taught ourselves to disregard moments in which our personal space is entered, to tolerate it and not directly react. The limbic and possessive reaction of animals has drawn Sarah to this idea of breaking boundaries, of forcing oneself on to the Other. These animals’ reactions may suggest what we want but cannot do.
Join us for our first solo exhibition: 
“Falling Apart and Into Place”
 
Nick Griffin
Opening: Friday, March 2nd, 7-9 PM  
Find FORUS on Facebook

Join us for our first solo exhibition:

“Falling Apart and Into Place”

 

Nick Griffin

Opening: Friday, March 2nd, 7-9 PM 

Find FORUS on Facebook

Photos from our past exhibition, The Prettiest and The Pinkest, Featuring artists Jade Abner, Lucy Parker, Allie Underwood and Chantal Wnuk.

Every year, Baton Rouge Gallery and Venus Envy (a Missouri-based non-profit organization driven by women which positively affects everyone by empowering women through the arts) team up to present an exciting multimedia contemporary art exhibition showcasing the work of female artists in the southeastern United States. The 14th annual Venus Envy Baton Rouge (VE2012BR) exhibition will run April 17-26, 2012.
The theme for VE2012BR is “Too Much Pink?” Artists are invited to interpret and explore the theme as they choose.
From an early age, whether welcomed or not, girls and women are oftentimes faced with the color pink as a gender-identifying color. From advocacy (breast cancer awareness) to marketing, children’s toys to clothing and everything in between, pink is often a part of the female experience. Some despise the color’s prevalence while others seek it out. Others remain indifferent. With this exhibition, we invite artists to explore the role the color pink – and the causes, things and perceptions often associated with the color - plays in the development, life and experience of women. Whether works utilize the color pink or not will not affect their eligibility.
The online submission form will be made active shortly. Download the full prospectus here.

Every year, Baton Rouge Gallery and Venus Envy (a Missouri-based non-profit organization driven by women which positively affects everyone by empowering women through the arts) team up to present an exciting multimedia contemporary art exhibition showcasing the work of female artists in the southeastern United States. The 14th annual Venus Envy Baton Rouge (VE2012BR) exhibition will run April 17-26, 2012.

The theme for VE2012BR is “Too Much Pink?” Artists are invited to interpret and explore the theme as they choose.

From an early age, whether welcomed or not, girls and women are oftentimes faced with the color pink as a gender-identifying color. From advocacy (breast cancer awareness) to marketing, children’s toys to clothing and everything in between, pink is often a part of the female experience. Some despise the color’s prevalence while others seek it out. Others remain indifferent. With this exhibition, we invite artists to explore the role the color pink – and the causes, things and perceptions often associated with the color - plays in the development, life and experience of women. Whether works utilize the color pink or not will not affect their eligibility.

The online submission form will be made active shortly. Download the full prospectus here.


(Artist Tom Sachs in his studio)
A few favorites:
Pay attention to the world and people around you.  You’ll need those observations.
Spend a lot of time with and around other artists. Talk. Drink with them. Go to openings with them.
Accept that you are not Picasso. You are almost certainly not a genius, as there are fewer than one of these per generation. Make up for it by working your ass off.
Do not wait for a dealer or curator or collector to give you a place to show. Especially these days. Get together with your peers and make it happen.
Until you’re so rich and famous that you can check out, you have to live in a community with an art scene, and you have to be a part of it.
Read the rest of Christina Rees’(former owner of Road Agent Gallery in Texas) tips here. ♥

Post from FLUX. BOSTON

(Artist Tom Sachs in his studio)

A few favorites:

  • Pay attention to the world and people around you.  You’ll need those observations.
  • Spend a lot of time with and around other artists. Talk. Drink with them. Go to openings with them.
  • Accept that you are not Picasso. You are almost certainly not a genius, as there are fewer than one of these per generation. Make up for it by working your ass off.
  • Do not wait for a dealer or curator or collector to give you a place to show. Especially these days. Get together with your peers and make it happen.
  • Until you’re so rich and famous that you can check out, you have to live in a community with an art scene, and you have to be a part of it.

Read the rest of Christina Rees’(former owner of Road Agent Gallery in Texas) tips here. ♥

Post from FLUX. BOSTON

Thank you all who came to FORUS’ first exhibition!

It felt like there was a mob here.

If you are still awake, have a good night.

We love you all.

Sincerely,

Jade and Donnie

5:36 @ 12:46 = The Best Show in Town!

Take a look at Pink The Exposed Color in Contemporary Art and Culture by Hantje Cantz
Check out Margaret Meehan’s Glasstire Blog post, Similar but Different #15: Ladies aren’t Ladies without Pink
 

Take a look at Pink The Exposed Color in Contemporary Art and Culture by Hantje Cantz

Check out Margaret Meehan’s Glasstire Blog post, Similar but Different #15: Ladies aren’t Ladies without Pink